Thursday, July 24, 2014

This Week's Shares -- July 25, 2014

Vegetables
Lettuce (2 heads again!) green cabbage,  fennel, rainbow carrots, sweet onions, green peppers, eggplant, cucumbers, summer squash, choice of kale or chard, beans (green, wax or purple), choice of an herb an possible broccoli or cauliflower. We will also be sending mizuna and other mustard greens as an extra.
Fruit

Blueberries
Plums

Eggs

Poultry 

Full Share Members/Half Share Members

Pasta

Cider

Pies
Half Share Members

The September 19th canning classes at the Kings Cooking Studio in Short Hills are beginning to fill up. For more detail and how to sign up click here



We will have Farm and Fork Society Tees at pick up for purchase. Made of 100% Organic Cotton and soft to the touch, you can own your own and show your support for your local farmers and CSA community! Available for $12 and in Adult sizes only - S, M, L 

Monday, July 21, 2014

Letter from John Krueger

Hello Folks, 
Things continue to do well here on the farm- crops are abundant and quality is good. We dodged a bullet with last week’s storms; receiving only about an inch of rain and no high winds or hail. Only about a mile north of us they got an inch of rain in 20 minutes on Monday afternoon but that cell fortunately missed our farm. It was unusual but not un-welcome to have such mild temperatures for Mid-July. 
We have the first few peppers and eggplant for you this week; with larger quantities to follow shortly. We have been harvesting a few tomatoes but not enough to distribute just yet; maybe next week…. Melons too, are on the horizon. Beans are not yet abundant but we should have enough for a half pound per share this week. Broccoli and cauliflower has nearly ended until the fall but we still have a fair amount in cold storage, so we will try to send one or the other to all groups; depending on how quality is holding up. As we head into mid-summer there will be a lot of cabbage in your future. Cabbage is the only really dependable brassica crop that can be harvested during typical July and August heat. We have some beautiful small heads of green cabbage for this week and red and Savoy to follow in the coming weeks. If you are German or Eastern European or even Irish, you will know what to do with the cabbage. For the rest, keep in mind that it keeps well (literally months) in the fridge. We always try to take a week off in between cabbage deliveries, to give folks a chance to use it up.  Think cole slaw or shred a bit to mix into your salads. If you still have beets, cabbage is good in a hardy borscht. We are also sending “Ailsa Craig” sweet onions this week. This is an heirloom variety which can make some very large bulbs and has a mild flavor. It does not keep well so don’t try to save them; you will be getting plenty of onions from here on out. We also have fennel and our multi –colored, “rainbow carrots” as newcomers to the shares this week.
The share for this week will be: Lettuce (2 heads again!) green cabbage,  fennel, rainbow carrots, sweet onions, green peppers, eggplant, cucumbers, summer squash, choice of kale or chard, beans (green, wax or purple), choice of an herb an possible broccoli or cauliflower. We will also be sending mizuna and other mustard greens as an extra.

Enjoy!      
Farmer John

Friday, July 18, 2014

Kale 101


Kale, also known as Borecole, comes in different varieties: curly, plain leaved, rape kale, leaf and spear, and Cavolo Nero (also known as Black Cabbage, Tuscan Cabbage, Tuscan Kale, Lacinato and Dinosaur Kale). Kale is related to Cabbage, Collards, Broccoli, and Brussels Sprouts, all members of  the Brassica family. Click here to learn more about Kale.

To Store

Store Kale in the refrigerator where it will keep for 5 days. The longer it is stored, the more bitter its flavor becomes. Do not wash Kale before storing; exposure to water encourages spoilage.

To Nourish

Kale has many health benefits. Kale is very high in Beta Carotene, Vitamin KVitamin C, and rich in Calcium. Kale is a source of two Carotenoids, Lutein and ZeaxanthinKale, as with Broccoli and other Brassicas, contains Sulforaphane (particularly when chopped or minced), a chemical with potent anti-cancer properties. Boiling decreases the level of Sulforaphane; however, steamingmicrowaving, or stir frying do not result in significant loss. Along with other Brassica vegetables, kale is also a source of Indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells. Kale has been found to contain a group of resins known as bile acid sequestrants, which have been shown to lower cholesterol and decrease absorption of dietary fat. Steaming significantly increases these bile acid binding properties. To learn more about health benefits of Kale click here


To Prepare

Kale can be eaten raw, steamed, sauteed and braised as a short list example. 


To Try 

Squash and Kale Toasts
Tuscan Kale Salad
Kale and Apple Salad with Pancetta and Candied Pecans
Flashed Cooked Green
Kale with Currants, Lemon and Olives 
Crispy Baked Kale with Gruyere Cheese
Gingery Creamed Kale and Cabbage 
White Bean and Kale Soup
Sea Scallops with Ham Braised Cabbage and Kale 
Kale and Steak Salad 
Homemade Green Chorizo Tacos with Kale and Potatoes 

To Use


Williams-Sonoma Cooking from the Farmers' Market Cookbook offers fresh inspiration for healthy, delicious dining. Their comprehensive cookbook offers 245 recipes designed to help you make the most of fresh produce. Each fruit and vegetable is accompanied by vibrant color photographs that make it easy to identify, along with three simple recipes showcasing the natural flavors of the starring ingredient. The book also provides detailed information on selection, storage and preparation for all types of produce. Hardcover, 272 pages. ($34.95, Williams-Sonoma)